Erik Dietman was born in 1937 in Jönköping in Sweden. He died in 2002 in Paris.

Hailing from Europe’s Far North, the Swedish artist is fond of weird-looking creatures, such as the reindeer living deep in the forest, half-animal, half-vegetable, with horns that can also be interpreted as a ribald wisecrack about cuckoldry. The primitive, animal nature of the sculpture is not only a piece of self-criticism but also a critique of modern sculpture, which Erik Dietman is always ready to challenge. In 1979, he entitled an exhibition “On leaving Duchamp’s house, I found the key to Picasso’s”. Here we see a group of works creating a crazy conversation about modern art and, more specifically, about sculpture.

This ensemble reminds the visitor of l’Ami de personne, a permanent work of the artist in the Tuileries garden.

SANS TITRE, 2002
Bronze
313 x 110 x 130 cm

FAMILLE URSINI (EXEMPLAIRE UNIQUE), 1999
Cast iron
190 x 200 x 200 cm

LE DERNIER CRI, 1994
Bronze
300 x 212 x 212 cm

Cortesy of Ceysson & Bénétière, Paris, Luxembourg, Saint-Étienne, New York

Photo : Marc Domage

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