10 artworks address and reinterpret mythology of different regions : from Ancient Greece to that of Caxinauás people.

Mimmo Jodice

Mimmo Jodice
Demetra, Opera lll, Ercolano, 1992
Vistamare/Vistamarestudio

Mimmo Jodice has used photography both to analyze reality and as an instrument of introspective investigation. His images document the impassioned interaction of the photographer’s eye with the world. Demetra, Opera lll, Ercolano, 1992, represents the vestals of the fascinating ancient world, testifying Jodice’s particular sensitivity to the world of archaeology and to the peoples whose stories became the myths of the Mediterranean world. Always choosing to work with the black and white, the image is enriched by infinite tons of grey giving the subject a deep shade.

Miryam Haddad

Miryam Haddad
Édifier la nuit, 2021
Art : Concept

The war in Syria obliged the artist to leave her country earlier than she had planned in 2012. This experience surely intensifies the drama of canvases that are built up into incandescent extasies of pigment lent jewel-bright hardness by fragments of stained glass and ceramic. Her paintings retain a defiant beauty that suggest that humanity, even at its most devastated, will find a way to rise from the depths.

‘The challenges of Miryam Haddad’s paintings are, more than ever, part of a logic of correlations. Whether it’s between small or large formats, between thickened out oil and the fluidity of watercolour, between fiction and fantasy, between the East and the West, the artworks, in line with the artists own logic, engage more in fertile dialogues than with confrontations.’*

In his latest works, the animal-symbols of Middle Eastern mythology evoke ancient tales. They are the artist’s way of putting into perspective the place of minorities in contemporary society.

*Alain Berland

Eric Croes

Eric Croes
Neptune amoureux, 2020
Gilles Drouault galerie/multiples

“I think of building ceramics as a drawing for modeling and as painting when glazing without the boundaries between all the techniques being so clear in my head”. Excerpt from the dialogue with Jean-Baptiste Bernadet “The joy of making objects”.

Glauco Rodrigues

Bergamin & Gomide
Glauco Rodrigues
Nossa Comida Abundante Está No 1 (from the Visão da Terra, a Lenda do Coati-Puru series), 1977

The series of ten paintings Visão da Terra, a Lenda do Coati-Puru produced by Glauco Rodrigues is a visual adaptation of a legend of the Caxinauás people. The series, which constituted the homonymous individual exhibition at the Galeria de Arte Ipanema in 1977, and also went to Brasília, Belo Horizonte e São Paulo, was painted based on stagings that the artist proposed to friends and actors.

In the story, the Caxinauás were dying of hunger and only fed on land until, enchanted by Coati-Puru, they began to live an illusion of abundance. After internal conflicts in the village, Coati escapes, the enchantment ends, and everyone goes back to eating land.It was the illusion of the Brazilian economic miracle that Glauco extolled in the legend collected and published by Capistrano de Abreu in 1914.

Barthélémy Toguo

Barthélémy Toguo
Untitled, Tondo, 2012
Sèvres

A red tondo inspired by Judith beheading Holofernes myth, a work by the Camerounian artist created between the artwork and the design piece.

Justin Matherly

Justin Matherly
Eat yourself fitter, 2019
Paula Cooper

Juxtaposing classical elements with anachronistic and humorous details, Justin Matherly explores psychological and bodily impairment, and the related themes of healing and regeneration. Eat yourself fitter features an enlarged reproduction of the head of Asclepius, the Greek god of medicine. The deity gorges on brightly colored tubes that tumble from its mouth in intestinal coils. The absurd action is both defiant and futile, grotesque and comical—bringing to mind the cannibalistic antagonist of the 1980 Italian horror film Antropophagus and the ancient ouroboros symbol of a serpent who eats its own tail.

Catalina Swinburn
Catalina Swinburn
Anahita, 2021
Selma Feriani

Taking its title from Anahita, the Indo-Iranian cosmological figure, cherished as the divinity of the Waters and associated with fertility, healing and wisdom. This sculpture is produced through weaving together archaeological documentation from Persian-Roman mosaics taken from the palace of Shapur I at Bishapur. Most of these artefacts are now housed at the Louvre Museum in Paris and the National Museum of Iran.

Lionel SABATTE

Lionel Sabatté
Phoenix du 18/09/2020, 2020
Galerie 8 + 4

Following the exhibition “Chimères de rouille et de poussière” (Chimeras of rust and dust) at the Maison des Arts de Bages in July 2020, Lionel Sabatté offers us a series of original works, created directly on the printing plates used to make the exhibition catalogue. Intervening directly on these plates, the artist creates a series entitled “Phoenix” made with acrylic and oxidation. These original works are the artist’s first interventions on printing plates, mixing the ghosts of his old images with new creations, giving birth to a renewed, fantastic and chimerical bestiary. Each work is framed. It is signed and dated.

Markus Lüpertz

Markus Lüpertz
“Jasons Abschied (Jason’s Farewell)”, 2020
Michael Werner

The Greek myth of Jason and the Golden Fleece is one of the oldest myths of a hero’s quest. It is a classic story of betrayal and vengeance, and like many Greek myths has a tragic ending. Jason, who was refused his rightful ascension to the throne by his uncle, was promised coronation if he were to find his ancestor’s Golden Fleece. He does so with the help of the sorceress Medea, who later became his wife. Returning to Greece to claim his throne, Medea and Jason are eventually forced into exile, where Jason takes on another wife, thus betraying his vows to the gods and Medea. In turn, Medea kills the second wife and the children she had with Jason, then leaves for Mount Olympus. Jason goes back to lolkos; there, while asleep under the stern of his once-glorious ship Argo, a rotten beam falls on him and crushes him to death.

Elizabeth Neel

Elizabeth Neel
Non Willendorf Venus, 2020
Salon 94

Elizabeth Neel’s paintings explore the mesmerizing and multifaceted nuances of abstraction, juxtaposing chaos with order. Her expressionistic technique involves pouring, brushing, printing, rolling, folding and dragging acrylic paint onto unstretched raw canvas. Leveraging these methods and layering these approaches allow her to embrace the intentional and the accidental. Her use of texture, unconventional negative space and surprising color contrasts awakens our senses. Her lexicon of symbols evolve throughout each body of work and the mirrored shapes she paints mimic the bilateral architecture of the body and its movement through our changing habitats. The granddaughter of American portrait painter Alice Neel, Neel has honed a multi-media practice over decades wherein literature, music, nature, movement, poetry and history surface on her canvases in unexpected ways, pushing against any single meaning or narrative.

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